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FOULS AND MISCONDUCT


                   Fouls and misconduct in football/soccer are acts committed by players which are deemed by the referee to be unfair and are subsequently penalized. An offence may be a foul, misconduct or both depending on the nature of the offence and the circumstances in which it occurs.
A direct free kick is awarded when a player:

●Kicks or attempts to kick an opponent

●Trips or attempts to trip an opponent

●Jumps at an opponent

●Charges an opponent

●Strikes or attempts to strike an opponent

●Pushes an opponent

●Tackles an opponent

●Holds an opponent

●Spits at an opponent

●Handles the ball deliberately

                    If any of these are fouls are committed by a player in their team’s penalty area, the opposing team is awarded a penalty kick. Indirect free kicks are awarded if a player:
●Plays in a dangerous manner
●Impedes the progress of an opponent ●Prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his/her hands
●Commits any other unmentioned offense 

Yellow cards are awarded as a caution or warning to a player and can be issued for the following offenses: Unsporting behavior Dissent by word or action Persistent infringement of the Laws of the Game

●Delaying the restart of play
●Failure to respect the required distance when play is restarted with a corner kick,free kick, or throw-in
●Entering or re-entering the field of play without the referee’s permission deliberately leaving the field of play without the referee’s permission
                    Red cards are used to send a player off the field, and can be issued for the following offenses:

●Serious foul play

●Violent conduct

●Spitting at an opponent or any other person

●Denying the opposing team a goal or an obvious goal-scoring opportunity by deliberately handling the ball (the goalkeeper being an exception)

●Denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity to an opponent moving towards the player’s goal by an offense punishable by a free kick or a penalty kick

●Using offensive or abusive language and/or gestures

●Receiving a second caution (yellow card) in the same match
  
                    The role of assistant referees in football or linesmen is primarily to assist the main referee by signaling for corner kicks, throw-ins, and violations of the offside law. They may also bring to the referee’s attention the infringements that he has not noticed of. However, it is always the head referee who has the final word.




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